Reactions to a Sea of Red: Guest Post by Chris Lippincott

An author’s reaction to editing is something editors worry about, as I did when I returned first edits to practicing psychic medium and bestselling author Chris Lippincott. Chris’s compelling storytelling only needed a light editing touch, and our collaboration on his work  paid off: Spirits Beside Us has been the #1 Amazon New Release in death, grief & spirituality since its release. It’s a fascinating look at his journey into mediumship, describes what the other side is like, and offers some remarkable mediumship readings and healing messages that have proven to be life-transforming to the recipients.

Take it away, Chris.

*****

When I began writing my first book, I thought I was creating a magnificent masterpiece. In my mind, it sounded like it flowed, and everyone would be able to understand exactly what I was trying to say. I wrote about my passion and about what I knew, so the content was certainly present. It seemed like the words had spewed forth onto the page like water from a garden hose. After I had completed all my edits and polished my first draft, I was utterly convinced it was the perfect manuscript. All it needed, in my mind, was someone to proofread my work, and it could soon join the great works of the world. Little did I realize, however, that often my writing style lacked the polish that would make it a great work.

Don’t Take Edits Personally

This came as a blow to my ego as well as a frustrating realization that I actually had much more work ahead of me. When I received my manuscript back from my editor Candace, I was at first horrified by the sea of red all over my draft. It practically looked like there were more red marks and corrections than there were black letters. I thought, “Well, clearly, she just doesn’t like my writing and has got it all wrong.”

Try as I might to avoid the extra work (or the blow to my ego), it began to dawn on me that many of her corrections were, in fact, quite necessary. What author ever wants their own words, their living, breathing manuscript, over which they have labored so tirelessly and finally given birth, to receive the painfully sharp cuts of an editorial scalpel? I venture to say no one would wish that upon their own worst enemy.

What author ever wants their own words, their living, breathing manuscript, over which they have labored so tirelessly and finally given birth, to receive the painfully sharp cuts of an editorial scalpel? Click To Tweet

However, to make our prose sing to the heavens and truly connect with our readers, we need the expertise of an editor well versed in the editorial process. It is their knowledge and expertise that enables them to polish our roughhewn manuscripts into shining gems. Editors are the unsung heroes of the literary world. They rarely receive the credit they deserve as they typically are hidden in the background, while the author’s name is seen in bright lights. However, without these critical editors, few authors would ever have their name in lights. Continue reading “Reactions to a Sea of Red: Guest Post by Chris Lippincott”

Announcing Breast Cancer: A History of Breast Cancer Treatment Told through Women’s Stories by David M. Mastrianni, MD

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in American women, according to Cancer.org. Currently, the average risk of a woman in the United States developing breast cancer sometime in her life is about 13%. This means there is a 1 in 8 chance  someone you know will develop breast cancer.

I received this letter the other day from oncologist David M. Mastrianni, MD:

“As the world struggles to deal with the COVID-19 infection, the life we knew seems forever changed. At the start of my career, I remember patients exposed to the newly discovered illness called HIV/AIDS sharing their fears of that plague. Today, we are globally facing the uncertainty that many patients with cancer know so well. At times it can be overwhelming, even threatening to make us stop working for a better future.”

“I am inspired by the many who push on. Each day it is my privilege to witness healthcare workers step up to meet this challenge, even if they are unsure of what it means. I see those in our community reach out to others, even as they maintain proper physical separation. And I see patients with cancer continue on in their own lives and struggles.

“Watching these heroes continue in their missions has given me encouragement to continue with one of my own. I am pleased to report that my book, Breast Cancer: A History of Breast Cancer Treatment Told through Women’s Stories, is now available on Amazon. The profits go to support cancer research in the lab of Dr. Daniel Tenen. During this time, it is particularly important that research on cancer continue and the scientists of the future be encouraged.

“During this crisis, please follow the instructions of your local health officials. We must take care of ourselves and each other. As we do, I believe we will overcome this challenge together.”

(signed) David Mastrianni, MD

The unvarnished reality of what it’s like to have breast cancer and its social and scientific history, told through the stories of six patients. Breast Cancer by David M. Mastrianni, MD #breastcancer Click To Tweet

Announcing an important new book about breast cancer, its history, treatment, and the women who battle the disease.

Today I’m honored to announce the publication of this important new book by medical oncologist David M. Mastrianni. In his almost thirty years in practice, he has heard the stories of hundreds of ordinary women in extraordinary fights against this all-too-common cancer. In Breast Cancer: A History of Breast Cancer Treatment Told through Women’s Stories, he shares the unvarnished reality of what it’s like to have breast cancer as told through the stories of six patients. Woven throughout the book is the fascinating cultural and scientific history of breast cancer treatment that will bring encouragement, comfort, and understanding to anyone whose life is touched by this disease. I invite you to read the free sample at the link above; I think you’ll be fascinated by both the stories of women profiled and the social and scientific history of this scourge that affects 1 in 8 women in the United States.

“I remember the moment the doctor told me I had cancer. Time stood still, and and I didn’t understand anything else she said. When the fog cleared, I had questions. Understanding cancer is a challenge, but you can do it. And you should.”  

—Carol, breast cancer survivor.

Continue reading “Announcing Breast Cancer: A History of Breast Cancer Treatment Told through Women’s Stories by David M. Mastrianni, MD”

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